State elections approve amendments

November 11, 2016 chris
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By Sarrah Peters, News Editor

On November 8, local citizens voted in national and local elections.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump won the majority of votes in Alabama, and went on to win the election.

In Alabama, all 14 of the state amendments on the ballot passed, with Etowah County supporting all but Amendment 12, which allows cities in Baldwin County to operate and issue bonds for toll roads. Amendment 1 staggers the terms of Auburn University’s Board of Trustee and adds to at-large members. Amendment 2 prohibited government from using state park funds for non-state park purposes and allows private companies to operate state parks. Amendment 3 allows the legislature to adopt new local amendments by unanimous vote. Amendment 4 allows county commissions to create administration based programs. Amendment 5 modernized the state constitution’s language about separation of powers, but didn’t change the powers. Amendment 6 changed the state’s impeachment requirements. Amendment 7 reorganized Etowah County’s Sheriff’s Department. Amendment 8 solidified the state as a “right to work” state. Amendment 9 required Pickens County Judges of Probate to be under 75 when elected or appointed. Amendment 10 requires territory in Calhoun County to be under the police and planning jurisdiction of municipalities within the county. Amendment 11 allows cities and counties to use Major 21st Century Manufacturing Zones to attract manufacturing. Amendment 13 removes age limits on non-judicial officials. Amendment 14 confirms any budget isolation resolutions for local laws.

Republican U.S. Senator Richard Shelby was re-elected over Democratic opponent Ron Crumpton.

In Etowah County’s only contested race, Larry Payne was re-elected to the District 4 seat on the Etowah County Commission.

Southside held an advisory vote during the general election to approve seven-day alcohol sales. The vote, conducted separately from the general vote, approved the sales. Southside joins several local cities that have approved seven-day sales including Gadsden, Rainbow City, Glencoe and Hokes Bluff.

Now, the city council must approve sales and set hours at a future meeting.