The Vagabond - Two beaux, one belle, and a very angry father

June 3, 2019 chris
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By Danny Crownover

The Vagabond recently wrote about Will I. Martin’s story of Bud Easterwood. We now we get to read the colorful story of his sister Ella.

The following article was clipped from the Jan. 1, 1893 issue of The Columbus Daily Enquirer of Columbus, Georgia:

“Gadsden has had a holiday week of a great time. The principal feature was a leap year party on Wednesday night at the residence of Mayor R.E. Thomas, given by “the girls.”

There was a very romantic wedding held during the holidays in the neighborhood of Fowler’s Ferry [located] eight miles below Gadsden. It seemed that Miss Ella Easterwood, a fine buxom country lass, had two beaux [sic] to whom she had promised herself in marriage, both to occur the same week.

“Walter Howard had the consent of Miss Ella’s father, and the marriage was to occur this week at the bride’s home. W.N. Richie had sued and won the promise of Miss Ella’s heart and hand, and he was to steal her and elope, as the young lady’s father objected to Mr. Richie as a son-in-law.

“With the Christmas festivities came a ball, to which Miss Easterwood was invited and attended. Mr. Richie came to town, procured a license and they were married at the ball.

“The next day, Mr. Easterwood and Mr. Howard started to this city to procure a license, when they were met by some neighbors and told of the turn the affair had taken. The air was blue with cuss words, and the father and his would-be son-in-law started in pursuit of the happy couple, but they had succeeded in getting out of their way.

“Mr. Howard can now lecture on the ‘Frivolity of Women.’ The question most asked afterward was, did Ella Easterwood stay married to W.N. Richie?

The answer to that question was found on a tombstone in the Forest Grove Cemetery in Telephone, Texas, where it reads: Ella Easterwood – Feb.14, 1872 – Mar.14, 1936/W.N. Richie – Dec. 16, 1869 – Apr 3, 1932.