Keep Smiling with Rosie Preston - Grandchildren and junk mail

October 30, 2020 chris
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

By Rosie Preston

This story happened many years ago when my three grandchildren were young, but since then, the United Post Office has very important issues while the Presidential votes are counted correctly. I decided I would bring this old article to life. Just remember that this was before cell phones were constantly being used.

The stack of mail to my right is the debts I owe. I always pay them on the first of each month. The stack to my left is junk mail, which includes promises to good to be true (an abundant of credit card offers and sales brochures, for example).

It doesn’t seem right about throwing way those “chance to win” offers. I’ll put them to the side and tell myself I’ll fill them out next week. Of course, next week never comes.

One letter asked, “What age do you fall into? 18 to 25, 26 to 30? Or have you reached that over the hill stage, skip to questions 16 to 339 and answer only if you can read the small print. If you are near the age of 50, please answer questions 26 to 30. After a brief nap, continue to question 31, which may not be legible if you do not wear bifocals. Have you endorsed the blank check? Remember, there is a promise that includes an offer that you may a received a check for $1000.00 for the rest of your life.”

Every time I look at that pile of junk mail, I remind myself that no one I know has ever won a dime. Yet after a few weeks, the television cameras entertain you with a family that has opened the door after a knocking sound. The lady will say, “And to think I almost threw away that mail!”

I looked at my grandchildren one day and observed how much they love to apply different kinds of stickers. They want to, and usually do, find many places to place them. So I came up with a plan that kept them entertained for about 10 minutes. I told them that I needed their help putting stamps on my envelopes (it was easy to find the stickers, of course). I gave each child a pen. They wrote their names on everything and applied stickers to the envelopes. I believe this can be classified as a real-life learning experience, as the postal employee accepted their letters and winked at me!

As I left, I wondered if maybe the post office kept a box for all the mail they receive from children where they could be so kind as to put my grandchildren’s letters in it!

I am one person who has had good luck with mailing packages using the U.S. Post Office. Only once have I ever had a letter returned – I was young and put coins in the envelope. That was not a good idea, as it was several weeks before the letter was sent back to me with a note about how the coins can clog up the machine. Oh, my! What had I done?

It was a lesson learned, and I’ll be ready when my great-grandchildren get older. The oldest are both six years old, then there is a four-year old, a three-year old and a 10-month old baby. The times I’ve spent with those children is too passionate to explain. But when the three and four-year old spend the night with me, somehow, we all sleep in a twin side bed that has the type of barrier on the side of the bed where one of them could fall off.

The children know their prayers, and we hold hands when we pray. Before the prayer time starts, they both tell me, “I am your best friend!”

It is true that those children are all best friends to me. I’ve loved them since the second they were born. It is so hard to explain that to some people, but for the ones who read this, please send me a story about something you’ve done to keep your grandchildren busy during this pandemic!

Keep smiling, Rosie